Samuel Mukasa

Samuel Mukasa
University of New Hampshire, United States
Dean, College of Engineering

Professor Samuel B. Mukasa is the Eric J. Essene Professor of Geochemistry, and Dean of the College of Engineering and Physical Sciences at the University of New Hampshire. He holds a Ph.D. in geochemistry from the University of California, Santa Barbara, an M.S. in geology from Ohio State University and a B.S. in geology from UNH. He also received a D.Sc. honorary degree from Nkumba University, Entebbe, Uganda in 2008. His administrative activities have included serving as: chair of the Department of Geological Sciences at the University of Michigan; President of the Geochemical Society; chair of the Office of Polar Programs Advisory Board at the National Science Foundation; member of the Polar Research Board; member of the National Academy of Sciences commission to develop protocols to safeguard the pristineness of Antarctic subglacial lakes, which are thought to be repositories of paleoclimate records that go back 30 million years; member of the National Academy of Sciences committee reviewing the International Ocean Drilling Program; and member of several National Science Foundation review panels. During his three-year tenure as chair of the Office of Polar Programs Advisory Board, Mukasa helped in the formulation of the $128-million South Pole Redevelopment Project (SPRP), provided critical input on the design and deployment of the $186-million icebreaker USCGC Healy, commissioned for research in the Arctic region, and participated in critical evaluation and modification of the NSF plans to implement the Congress-mandated Government Performance Results Act (GPRA). Mukasa was elected Fellow of the Geological Society of America in 2005, and Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in 2006. His research interests include: integrated use of trace elements and Pb, Nd, Sr, Hf and Os isotopes to model the evolution and dynamics of Earth's mantle as recorded by materials derived from alpine peridotite massifs, ultramafic xenoliths, arc lavas, and continental flood basalts; uranium-series disequilibrium (U, Th, Pa and Ra) in arc and continental rift lavas; chemical and physical dynamics of the magma chambers that form layered mafic intrusions; applications of U-Pb (SIMS and TIMS) and 40Ar/39Ar geochronology to providing constraints on the evolution of the continents, and continental and oceanic magmatic arcs; kinematic evolution of orogenic belts and their bearing on palinspastic plate reconstructions and the tectonic histories of supercontinent amalgamations and breakups; and fluid migration through mantle and crustal pathways as quantified in olivine melt inclusions.